• Transporter Room 3@startrek.website
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    12 days ago

    Someone works in HR and is tired of rightly being called out for being a corporate stoog who will always side against the employee…

    “Am I out of touch? No, it’s the employees who are wrong.”

    • fmstrat@lemmy.nowsci.com
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      11 days ago

      If someone spends 95% of their day helping some people, and 5% hurting others, it can be hard for them to separate the two. It’s a purposeful, systemic issue driven from the top down in more than just HR. Law enforcement, middle management, even insurance to an extent.

      Business leaders need to step up to take responsibility for their teams before anything in HR will change. This is why I like small companies.

      • nilloc@discuss.tchncs.de
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        10 days ago

        Insurance is more than “to some extent”. Insurance companies are there to make a profit and protect as much of their gross revenue as possible (not just US health insurance either). The more they give back to customers as claims, the less they have for market investment, or just straight CEO pay and shareholder dividends. One possible exception for non-profit insurance companies, but they are pretty rare (unless you’re in Florida and the state insurance is all that’s left).

  • UpperBroccoli@lemmy.blahaj.zone
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    12 days ago

    For *, you despise HR, those fucking corpo muppets that will attempt to stab you in the back at every opportunity.

    Remember rule of acquisition #48:

    The bigger the smile, the sharper the knife.

    Never forget, HR is your enemy.

    • Pringles@lemm.ee
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      12 days ago

      I know a lot of women with university degrees (humanities) who ended up in HR, for some reason, and very bright ones as well. And while I have experienced shitty HR, I’ve also had the exact opposite where HR was super helpful and generally great people.

      • AgentOrangesicle@lemmy.world
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        12 days ago

        I’ve met ones responsible for introducing new company policies targeting specific individuals because their medical treatment was getting too expensive. I would almost rather deal with full-time landlords.

          • AgentOrangesicle@lemmy.world
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            11 days ago

            Guy in the Lab in his 60’s - still great at his job - canned because his wife had late stage cancer and needed a lot of treatment. Those in the Lab knew that he smoked weed (the entire Production department also smoked). They tested him and no one else. Bro had an art to conducting a Farinograph that will be lost to time. His wife passed less than a year later.

            The same company (very illegally) fired everyone trying to unionize a few decades ago, so it tracks out. They just didn’t know how to form a collective and make a Class Action.

              • AgentOrangesicle@lemmy.world
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                11 days ago

                You’re welcome! I’m sorry for sharing. A lot of people left that place far worse off than me, and it was a tragic introduction to inequity for me. I’m here because I’m horrified. Most people should be. I’ll give you more details in a DM if you have any questions.

          • GBU_28@lemm.ee
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            11 days ago

            I’ve met ones responsible for introducing new company policies targeting specific individuals because their medical treatment was getting too expensive. I would almost rather deal with full-time landlords.

            • AgentOrangesicle@lemmy.world
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              11 days ago

              Not sure what this bot is on about, but it’s repeating my sentiment word-for-word but in bold, which is kinda scary. Would recommend downvoting.

              • GBU_28@lemm.ee
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                11 days ago

                Woosh.

                This joke is as old as the Internet. It’s as if he couldn’t “hear” you.

                • AgentOrangesicle@lemmy.world
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                  10 days ago

                  Ah, sorry, I thought you were responding to me directly at first. I’m as old as the internet. I’m just a little slow at times.

      • orcrist@lemm.ee
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        12 days ago

        Individual people might be decent, but the general goal of HR is to protect leadership (and profits for leadership) … and should that be at your expense, then sacrifices must be made.

        Anyone with extensive experience working for a large company knows the golden rule: CYA, and make HR CYA too, so they don’t screw you over. And when they do, your CYA will make your lawyer’s life easier, so the company will settle instead of force you to court.

        • Ragnarok314159@sopuli.xyz
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          11 days ago

          The stupidest HR thing I dealt with involved an employee who had genuine mental issues and he always had the “everyone is out to get me”. He was African American, and would play that card constantly. The thing was, our little lunch group had a black woman and she kept telling him to knock that shit off.

          HR decided that since we were all white and he is playing the minority card, someone had to go to avoid the lawyer issue as he perceived a bias towards him. Then we get a call about how HR was very sorry, and then suddenly he stopped following us to lunch and taking pictures of us while eating.

          Someone in HR did some digging before firing everyone saw that I was a combat veteran and it immediately became a battle of which protected class is more protected. Turns out the combat veteran was and his dumbass said something about “he is a veteran and I don’t like that!”

          I hate HR because they were going to fire us over someone else stalking us, taking pictures, and making up stuff that no one could confirm. He eventually got the help he needed after a complete breakdown. Ran into him at the grocery store and he apologized for everything.

  • fckreddit@lemmy.ml
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    11 days ago

    Why is she listing responsibilities of HR and asking us to feel grateful about them? Why do they act self-important?

    • Echo Dot@feddit.uk
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      11 days ago

      The only times anyone should talk to HR is when they are hired for a job and when they leave a job and you don’t talk to HR until you’re actually leaving. Not when you’re thinking about it. When you are ready to walk out the door, and you have another employment offer or you are retiring. Never before then.

  • vithigar@lemmy.ca
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    12 days ago

    “Waiving the notice period” my ass. It’s wild to me how this idea that it’s required to give notice when you’re quitting a job is so ingrained in society.

    It’s a courtesy you can extend if you want to ease the transition for the company or leave on good terms, but it is absolutely not required.

    • riodoro1@lemmy.world
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      11 days ago

      I think in many countries it’s codified by law.

      But hear this: the employer needs to give notice too. Crazy right?

      • mattreb@feddit.it
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        11 days ago

        In Italy it’s required by your contract, but you no longer need HR fortunately, there’s a dedicated website, and yes employer notice MUST be the same as the employee one…

      • EnderMB@lemmy.world
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        11 days ago

        I think in India, maybe some parts of Asia too? I think it’s less to do with bit working notice but not carrying out your contracted obligation.

      • Grandwolf319@sh.itjust.works
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        11 days ago

        But how would that work? They are gonna put you in jail for not working 2 extra weeks?

        You get paid to work, if you fail to do so then you won’t get paid, that’s all there is to it.

        • riodoro1@lemmy.world
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          11 days ago

          Ummm. No. You are contractually obligated to work. You could get sued by not doing what you signed up to do, or in fact doing it negligently. However I don’t think that happens often.

          Also, if you fail to fulfill your obligation good luck getting legal employment later.

          It may sound weird to people living in certain country but remember the laws protect the employers as well as they do protect employees.

          • Grandwolf319@sh.itjust.works
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            11 days ago

            You are contractually obligated to work.

            Yeah I guess it depends on the terms of your employment.

            I was talking about hourly and salary employees. For those cases, unless you signed something special, you can just stop working tomorrow. The consequence would be not getting paid tomorrow (or any other day). You can try and sue anyone for anything, but chances of it working is very low.

            • riodoro1@lemmy.world
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              11 days ago

              Ok, im in Poland and I think the laws are similar enough across all of europe, but it’s true at least in Poland. Every legal employee has to sign a contract of employment with his employer, those fall into categories based on conditions of the work but most common is “contract of employment” which in fact is heavily regulated by law. Termination terms are one of the things that are regulated.

              Pretty much it’s illegal to hire someone willy nilly, the state needs to know about it for the purposes of social security and taxation for example.

              • Grandwolf319@sh.itjust.works
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                11 days ago

                I’m in Canada and you can walk away from your job at any time. It’s common courtesy to give two weeks notice but you can give 1 day notice if you really wanted to.

            • azertyfun@sh.itjust.works
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              11 days ago

              Belgian here. The rules vary depending on the collective agreement the position falls under (hospitality workers’ unions negotiate separately from construction workers’ for instance).

              Most people in most jobs are some variation of salaried (whether on a fixed or indeterminate duration contract) and the contract must be broken either upon natural termination (fixed contract or tryout period), with a predetermined amount of notice time, or due to an egregious fault (multiple warning notices, stealing from the employer, failing to pay the employee, etc.).

              Contractors can be hired and fired willy-nilly, but they normally get paid enough for that not to be a concern. I’m not aware of “hourly” contracts in the way North-Americans usually mean them, AFAIK the number of weekly working hours must always be determined in advance. I just checked, in the hospitality industry there is obviously some regulated leeway for scheduling but the yearly average must be exactly 38 hours/week (hence why some Americans always complain that European waiters aren’t kissing their boots every 5 seconds). Though there are many different collective agreements, each with enough different rules to keep the employment lawyers well fed.

              “Odd jobs” are legal and not subject to those rules, but if you regularly employ someone for “odd jobs” then it is very likely that were they to challenge it in court, the judge would reclassify that as a salary position and rule according to that and even possibly fine the employer for unlawful employment. Generally speaking if someone can just walk away from a job with no repercussions in Belgium, I’d expect that it is either an illegal employment situation, some kind of odd/seasonal job, or a job where the employer just doesn’t care enough to sue (if they were paying out the minimum wage, they certainly aren’t going to get anything back by suing!).

              • noli@lemmy.zip
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                10 days ago

                Fellow belgian here.

                While I agree with what you wrote here there are some other forms of employment too, which do not get the same protections: student jobs, interim jobs and I think flexijobs.

                IIRC, not too long ago there was even quite a fuss about interim jobs being abused for long-term employment without worker protections.

    • BorgDrone@lemmy.one
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      10 days ago

      Depends on where you live. Unless you explicitly specify something else in the employment contract, the notice period here (the Netherlands) is 1 month for the employee and 2 months for the employer. If you do specify it in the contract, the notice period for the employer has to be at least twice that of the employee.

    • lud@lemm.ee
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      11 days ago

      You absolutely need to give notice if your employment agreement says so. Where I live the collective agreement usually says that you have to give notice and so does the employer. The employee usually needs to give less notice though.

      A similar version is likely in the law too much I don’t know for sure.

    • Echo Dot@feddit.uk
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      11 days ago

      I work in corporate I.T and HR frequently tell us to delete user accounts only for us to then get calls from users who don’t understand why their accounts are being deleted. This happens five or six times a year. I don’t understand how they can think people are leaving when they’re not. It’s not even like they were on maternity leave or something, they are just plugging away, doing their jobs without issue, and then HR randomly decided they quit.

      You have to be a special kind of moron to work in HR, a simple lack of intelligence just doesn’t cut it, you need to be able to not only make a mountain out of a mole hill, but make a mountain out of completely flat terrain.

      • Obi@sopuli.xyz
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        11 days ago

        This has to be a huge company right? I can understand it at companies like Nike or whatever where HR functions basically turn into customer-support type roles where you’re dealing with 100 tickets a day and there’s no ownership beyond your tiny little cogwheel in the huge machine and there’s no way to know all employees so they’re just numbers to you. They basically got the number wrong. If it’s a small or medium size company though they might be smooth brained.

  • SeattleRain@lemmy.world
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    10 days ago

    People a re starting to catch on that HR isn’t some neutral arbitrator but really just corporate goons who will back stab you.

    I guess this lack of trust is starting to get to them.

  • wieson@feddit.org
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    10 days ago

    I’ve never made fun of hr, never seen a reason to. Also I have the feeling, that they’ve very much my health in mind and are on my side more than the employer.

    But I live neither in the USA nor India, so different rules, different culture.

      • wieson@feddit.org
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        10 days ago

        Surely they have their own dystopian capitalist modus operandi, but just as a factoid:

        HR is actually called Personalabteilung in my language (personnel department) and I am personnel.

        • DragonTypeWyvern@midwest.social
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          10 days ago

          Reasonable name for a society that doesn’t consider workers objects. That was actually the most common name for it in America before neoliberalism started neoliberaling.